Emergency planning

Emergency Preparedness, Resilience and Response (EPRR)

The NHS needs to plan for, and respond to, a wide range of incidents and emergencies that could affect health or patient care. These could be anything from extreme weather conditions to an outbreak of an infectious disease or a major transport accident. The Civil Contingencies Act (2004) requires NHS organisations, and providers of NHS-funded care, to show that they can deal with such incidents while maintaining services.  Under the Civil Contingencies Act and the Health and Social Care Act 2012, Clinical Commissioning Groups have a number of statutory duties to undertake in their role for preparing and responding to emergencies. 

The purpose of the Civil Contingencies Act (CCA) 2004 is to;

  • Establish a clear set of roles and responsibilities for local responders;
  • Give greater structure and consistency to local civil protection activity;
  • Establish a sound basis for performance management at a local level 

An emergency is classed as;

  • An event or situation which threatens serious damage to human welfare
  • An event or situation which threatens serious damage to the environment
  • War, or terrorism, which threatens serious damage to security 

Under the CCA, a CCG is a Category 2 responder during an emergency – so we do not take the lead but would be involved in incidents that affect our sector and would be provide support to NHS England in their role as a primary responder (Category 1).  Our obligations under the Act include ensuring we have relevant policies and plans in place for dealing with incidents including business continuity and major incident plans.   

All NHS funded organisations also have to meet a number of core standards and complete an annual assurance process overseen by NHS England.  We will publish the results of the 2017/18 assurance process on this page in January 2018.

Page last updated 29 November 2017